#truck camper

i’m selling my four wheel campers keystone truck camper. it’s in great condition and hasn’t seen that much use. most of its life it’s been in the garage. i’m open to reasonable offers on the selling price. i’m also open to keeping the compost toilet and maybe the refrigerator, tripod jacks, dolly, and perhaps a couple other components that i could sell separately. the camper came with a thetford cassette/cartridge toilet that is practically new — it was only used a couple or few times and i did not even fill up the cassette once before dumping it. this camper is 9′ long and is designed for a long bed truck. it can be bolted down or tied down with a built-in turnbuckle system. an alternate method for usage, transportation, or storage would be to place it on a flat trailer.

here is a very detailed full tour video i made going over everything it has: www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4oFCYPtEx8

if you’re interested in purchasing it, or know someone who is, please send me a message here: markmarano.com/contact/

i found most of the original invoices and receipts for the camper. here’s a list of all the options and add-ons the camper has, along with the original prices i paid for everything:

— four wheel campers keystone base model $13995
— 12v/110v low power compressor fridge $1400
— furnace, forced air w/thermostat $495
— hot water/outside shower package $595
— DSI optional electric start for hot water heater $155
— screen door $235
— fan-tastic fan $295
— front opening window $175
— awning $695
— awning rail $32
— auxiliary battery system with separator $395
— second battery $275
— small drivers side window $175
— gas strut roof lift assist system $250
— bolt down and wiring $495
— arctic pack $475
— roof hatch $995
— 2 Sharp 130W pv modules $1314
— charge controller $329
— cable kit $79
— installation of solar $498
— propane pressure reg + purge/fill $42
— rv water hose $13
— aqua-kem holding tank deod $9
— rv water pressure regulator $10
— 600 watt true sinewave inverter + installation $366
— custom sink drain tubing $112
— compost toilet + installation $1484
— additional power outlets + installation $238
— custom camera mounts $117
— freight / destination + pre-delivery inspection $1980
— taxes on camper and dealer additions $1663
— rieco-titan tripod jacks $500
— parts for dolly $201
— labor to engineer + build custom heavy duty dolly $?
— hitch step $27
— longer shower hose + piece to hold above shower $31
— extra window frame for screened window in front $53
— screen for extra window frame $?
— longer shower pan $58
— rv water filter + hose extension $?
— addition of locks to cabinet doors so won’t open on their own $?
— storage area dividers $21
— storage bins/crates $?
— rv dish drying rack $?

adding everything up comes to a total of at least $30,277 — this is counting $0 for everything with a $? above. if you don’t count the $3,643 for tax, freight, and pre-delivery inspection (that were part of the actual acquisition cost of the camper), and take off the base model price, you’ll see all of the options, modifications, and add-ons come to a total of at least $12,639 (again, not counting some things i don’t have the receipts readily accessible for).

it’s a little difficult to determine the exact value as this is now a rare unit (as four wheel campers is no longer producing the larger keystone model). the biggest model fwc is currently making is the grandby which is a foot shorter — this is most likely either a marketing decision or to save on manufacturing costs by trimming their line, as lots of people are buying trucks with shorter beds (which wouldn’t be recommended for the 9ft keystone model). being a rare model and harder to find (especially loaded with most of what fwc offered plus extra additions professionally installed that they didn’t offer from the factory), its value will be a bit more than the high value four wheel campers already hold.

this camper hasn’t seen that much use either. it went on two long trips: one from the chicago area to the west coast and then back to florida (over a total of 72 days), and another from chicago to maine and then down the east coast to florida (a total of 22 days). it also saw a few shorter trips: the original trip home from the dealer in north carolina to florida, a trip back to the dealer in north carolina (from florida) to install additional components (and then back home), two trips to chicago from florida, and a couple/few trips in florida. most of its life it’s been in the garage. i purchased it new in october of 2011 and it’s been in the garage (in florida) since august of 2013. i sold my truck in january of 2014 and am not going to be getting another anytime soon so the camper is ready for a new home. it’s very clean, in great/excellent condition, like new.

this is your chance to get a unique camper that’s ready to go on new adventures. please contact me to make a reasonable offer and arrange to come pick it up in florida. if you can’t make the trip here, i can possibly make arrangements to deliver or ship it to you.

*** UPDATES below

i’ve gotten some questions about the price.. i’m open to reasonable offers on the camper and can consider keeping some components to go a little lower on the price. altogether, i’ve got over $30k in it and it’s in great condition with not that much use (and rare), so somewhere in the lower $20k’s would be good.

*** truck requirements ***

i’ve been asked about what truck it will fit, the weight, dimensions, etc. when i ordered the camper i didn’t know what truck i was going to buy, so i think they built it as a universal model to fit any truck. i don’t know its exact weight — the sticker on the back says 1095 lbs though that’s probably empty and was before adding the additional options. terry at four wheel campers estimated that my camper probably weighed close to 1500 lbs with everything. the bottom of it is 9′ long so it hangs past the end of the truck bed a little (and a few inches past the back of the bumper). it’s designed for a truck with a full size bed though i’ve seen others use theirs on a short bed truck (but this is probably not recommended by FWC). the cabover part adds just under 4′ to the overall length (making it right about 13′ long from the front of the cabover section to the back of the camper). the width is 80″ and another 3.5″ for the awning on one side. the height from the bottom of the camper (where it would sit on the bed of the truck) to the underside of cabover section is 48″ or just under 48″. if you have a very tall cab (or big lights or something on top of it), you could place a wood board or something under the camper to lift it up a bit. it’s also recommended to place a rubber bed mat under the camper as that helps prevent it from shifting around when driving (though this is probably only a potential issue when off-road). the width of the part that goes between the wheel wells is 48″ (or 48.125″). the height of the camper from where it sits on the bed of the truck to its top is just under 57.75″ with the solar panels adding just over 2.25″, making the total height from the bottom of the camper to the top of the solar panels right about 60″. i recall the overall height of the truck and camper (when it was on the bed of my heavy duty F-150) being right around 7.5′ from the ground so it worked really well in low clearance areas. (all these measurements are for when driving or storing it, with the top/windows/awning/door/etc closed)

*** more on price + value ***

i just looked at the numbers to determine a fair price for the camper with everything it has. i looked on nadaguides and the options they are showing seem like they might just be generic as they’re not exactly what FWC was offering. they also don’t show a high retail condition, only a low and average. i would say the condition of my camper in not seeing that much use and being very clean would fit into a “high” or “clean” retail or very good / near excellent condition, which basing on the $1700 difference between low and average, would put a high retail around $11,400 for the camper without any of the additional options. its hard to get an exact estimate on the value of all of the additional components without doing lots of research, though based on the $11,400 “high retail” being 81.5% of the $13,995 suggested list price, the more than $12,639 worth of options would be worth at least $10,301, bringing the “high retail” with all the options to $21,701. (this is not factoring in any of the $3650 that the freight, tax, and pre-delivery inspection cost — if you consider these, the total cost to buy everything new was over $30,277. at a price of $21,701, the camper would be almost 30% less than it cost new, and considering the number of days it’s been used compared to sitting in the garage, it’s seen under 10% use and is in like new condition.) if the calculation of how i got to the $21,701 doesn’t make sense, i can explain it better if you like. as i mentioned above, i’m also open to keeping certain components for a different price.

*** details of option prices ***

i had someone ask about how much the options really were worth so i went over to nadaguides again to try to figure out where they’re at for the options. here are some of the things i’m seeing that are close to or the same as the options i ordered:

looking at the power roof vent they offer, their low value is 130 and average is 155, making the “high” or “clean” value 180, which is 61% of the 295 i paid for the fantastic fan. and since power roof vent is generic, it might be worth more being a fantastic vent as that’s one of the major rv vent brands.

looking at the water heater 6 gallon gas/elec w/DSI — they have low retail as 190 and average retail as 230 — this would make “high” or “clean” retail 270. the outside shower low is 100 and average is 115, making high 130. both the heater + outside shower together add up to 400 — i paid 750 (595 for the hot water + outside shower and 155 for the DSI electric start option), making high retail 53.333% of the new cost. their numbers don’t add up exactly as the DSI option adds 100 above their water gallon average price, making it add 110 more at the calculated high price, which would be 71% of the new price for the DSI option.

looking at the solar panel 130 watt, they have low as 700 and average as 800, making high 900. they have the solar battery charger low as 430 and average as 520, making high 610. i have 2 130 watt panels so their total would be 2410 (900+900+610) as a high price. i actually paid less than this, 2220 total for the solar + install (1314+329+79+498), making the high retail 108.555% of what i paid new.

for the awning, they have 380 low and 455 average, making high 530. i paid 727 (695+32) for the awning + rail, making it worth 72.9% of the new price (or 76.3% if you don’t count the rail as it was a separate option when i ordered it). their awning doesn’t specify the brand and its a Fiamma, one of the major rv manufacturers for awnings, so not sure if that makes a difference or not.

the numbers do exhibit a wide range of % compared to what the new cost is. if we add up everything above to get an overall average, at the high value/condition, their #s would be 3520 for those specific options (400+180+2410+530). i paid 3992 for those options new (750+295+2220+727), making them worth 88.2% of what i paid new.

if we were to go by their average price rather than their high price, their total would be 3075 for the above comparison (230+115+155+800+800+520+455), making them worth an average of 77% of the new cost.

i’m not looking at their fridge as i didn’t order the regular option and got a special low power + better quality compressor one instead. i did see some furnace options there though they didn’t list the thermostat option separately like they did for the DSI for the water heater, so its hard to determine exactly where that would sit. if we counted it at their price without the thermostat and went with the lower unit (as i have to go look to see if it says the BTU’s on it or not), its high value would be 100 (70 for low, 85 for average — though the more powerful one is 85 low and 105 average, which would be 125 high). adding the 100 to the total high above makes everything above 3620. i paid 495 new for the forced air furnace with thermostat, making the total new for the above options 4487, bringing the overall average high value of the options down to 80.677% of the new cost (but its likely really higher than this because i have the thermostat with it).

they do also list values for some options like dry bath (290 low or 350 average, making high 410), lpg gas/smoke detector (120 low and 140 average, making high 160), and toilet-electric flush (330 low and 400 average, making high 470, or more as the cassette toilet was barely used) which i got from FWC but was not charged separately for by the dealer, so this effectively brings the $11,400 high value of the camper up another 1040 to $12,440 or 88.888% of the $13,995 i paid.

so it’s tricky to come up with the exact value and fair price for it, though it seems like somewhere in the lower $20k’s is about right.

if we go by the 80.677% as the overall average high price of the options they had listed, the $12,639 the options cost new are now worth $10,196.77, though if we consider that i also got the few options that have value included in the $13,995 i paid, the high value of the camper is $12,440, making the high/clean value of the camper with options $22,636.77, which is 76.77% of the $30,277 total i paid for everything new including the tax, freight, pre-delivery inspection, etc that were part of the acquisition costs (it was actually more than $30,277 that i paid but i don’t have the receipts for all the little things so didn’t count them)

*** package options ***

based upon the last calculation using nada, the fair value of the camper is at least $22500 to $23000 (or perhaps much more as it’s rare and in great condition with little use). as that may be beyond your desired budget, i’m offering several different package options where i’d keep certain items to go lower on the price. i’m open to other offers as well — let me know what price range you want or what options you want and i’ll come up with something.

— $ 22,500 — you get everything listed above
— $ 21,500 — i keep the compost toilet and dolly (with any of the packages, you still get the original cassette toilet that is practically new, and i’ll leave the ventilator, mounting brackets, and wiring in place so its ready for a new compost toilet to drop right in if you want to add it later)
— $ 20,500 — i keep the compost toilet, refrigerator, and dolly
— $ 20,000 — i keep the compost toilet, refrigerator, dolly, and tripod jacks
— $ 19,500 — i keep the compost toilet, refrigerator, dolly, tripod jacks, arctic pack, and power inverter
— $ 19,000 — i keep the compost toilet, refrigerator, dolly, tripod jacks, arctic pack, power inverter, solar panels, solar charge controller, and gas strut roof list assists (i’ll leave the internal solar wiring in place so you can hook up your own panels later if you want)

buy it this month (April) and i’ll take $500 off any of the above packages (i can keep it stored safely in the garage if you are unable to come get it right away, though i will need the majority of it paid in order to hold it for you more than a couple days). yes, the middle or higher packages are a better value, though with the $500 discount for buying it this month, you can get a rare Keystone camper in great condition and ready for new adventures for as low as $18,500.

please write me here to buy it: www.markmarano.com/contact/

these are all the star-lapses i shot on the journey i took from chicagoland to california and then to florida, between september and november of 2012

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

recently i’ve come across a number of videos by couples who are living out of a van and sharing their experiences online. it’s been quite inspirational to watch them share their stories and journeys. shortly after i first got my truck camper i had thought of creating a video journal of my life on the road, though never did in the manner i had first thought of. i ended up shooting films comprised of short clips and time-lapses of my journey instead. i feel inspired to complete the rest of the videos, or at least the remaining ones from chicagoland to california (for now).

check out some of their videos. the first video is Mat and Danielle, of Exploring Alternatives, whom share why they love living a van. they also have a lot of videos on their youtube channel with tips of what they’ve learned in their lifestyle. in the second video, Emily and Corey of Where’s My Office Now? interview others living nomadic lifestyles (this is the last video in the series they did). they have other videos on their youtube channel as well. the last video is of Rachel and James from Idle Theory Bus (whom Emily and Corey caravanned with to do the interview series). they have a few more videos on their vimeo channel. each video has a little bit different feel. it’s interesting that all three couples began their journeys around the same time (which is also around the time i was on my journey out west with my truck and camper). it’s also beautiful to see the awareness they have or gain during their journeys.

watch their videos, explore their websites, and be inspired to do what you’re passionate about or feel called to, regardless of whether or not its something considered out there or not normal. so many people conform to the norms of society because that’s all they know or because they are afraid to do otherwise. it’s absolutely possible to live an alternate lifestyle and really enjoy doing it. it can open a whole new world to you and might just be much simpler than you imagine once you get going. you can often do so much more with less. start to let go of what no longer serves you. lately i’ve been selling a few things and getting rid of old stuff, and it feels so liberating to clear up that space and make room (not just physically but also in energy and attention) for what i do want to create in my life. part of me has even thought about selling my condo. i’ve thought a little more about getting my own land and building a sustainable or earth-friendly home, or getting a van or another truck and going traveling or even living nomadically (especially if i meet a nice, sweet, pretty girl who’d like to join me on the journey).

anyhow, i’ll stop writing before i end up rambling more. enjoy the videos, be inspired, and do what you love (or simply be)!

www.exploringalternatives.ca
www.wheresmyofficenow.com
www.idletheorybus.com

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

I’ve decided to sell my camper. I’m not planning any long road trips or camping any time soon, so I am going to part ways with it and put the proceeds toward purchasing a home. I’m sure I’ll do more traveling in the future, though right now a new home will better suit me.

The camper is loaded with the majority of options Four Wheel Campers offers. It has everything you need to camp, live, or work out of it on short or long trips, and without needing to go to campgrounds (unless you want to). It’s in great condition and in the little time I’ve had it, I’ve taken it on a couple of long trips where I drove through all 48 contiguous states! This truck camper was featured in Truck Camper Magazine earlier this year when I was interviewed about my truck camper journeys.

The camper was custom built by Four Wheel Campers — it was completed and ready for pick up at the dealer in October 2011. Most options were installed at the factory, though I had a few things added later by the dealer (they do custom installs as well as custom parts fabrication). The Keystone model is 9’ long and will hang out a little past the end of a full size truck bed. Its recommended to remove the tailgate rather than keep it down with the end of the camper sitting on part of it. For its size, durable build quality, and all the installed options, its fairly lightweight — its estimated to weigh 1500 lbs.

To read all the details about why I originally chose my camper and truck, follow this link: markmarano.com/2012/01/11/why-i-chose-a-four-wheel-campers-keystone-truck-camper-and-a-4x4-ford-f-150-supercab-heavy-duty-truck-with-ecoboost

To see lots of pictures of the camper, look here: markmarano.com/what/truck-camper

The camper is currently garaged in Tampa Bay, just north of Clearwater. You’ll need to come pick it up. It’s nice and warm here in Florida, with plenty of places to see as you begin your truck camper journey.

If you need a truck, I’m also selling my truck, a 2011 4×4 Ford F-150 XLT SuperCab (with twin turbo EcoBoost engine and Heavy Duty Payload package) that I custom ordered for the camper. It currently has about 38,500 miles on it and has most of the options that were available. I’ve driven it with care and most miles are highway miles from the long trips. The truck is a great fit for the camper and has plenty of power even when the camper is loaded and tanks are full. When the camper is on the truck, the back end sits level and does not sag down like some campers do on trucks. I built custom platforms for storage and to hold a folding bike in the cab (when the rear seat is removed) — you can have these with the truck or camper if you’re interested. If I haven’t sold the truck, I could consider driving the camper to you for an additional amount, though the camper will have to be paid for in advance (and payment will need to be cleared before I drive to you).

Below are the features and options on the camper (I’ve probably forgotten some). I have all the original instruction manuals and paperwork that came with the camper (and accessories/components). Please click here or on the contact link at the bottom of the page to send me a message if you’re interested in it or know anyone that is.

 

interior

  • very spacious feel compared to other pop up truck campers
  • extended cabover bed is queen size and very comfy (can be made into a full size for more interior room)
  • rollover couch with large storage area underneath (this is useful for sleeping on when you don’t want to pop the top on the camper though not as comfortable)
  • interior lights in front (over bed) and in back (over stove + sink)
  • gas strut lift assist system (greatly helps ease popping up the camper roof)
  • arctic pac (this thermal pack provides better insulation in both cold and hot weather)
  • forced air furnace with thermostat (thermostat is nice so its not constantly running all night — this furnace is very efficient on propane use)
  • durable, lightweight, easy to clean vinyl flooring
  • LED floor lighting with switch right near door
  • fabric color on the roll-over couch and bed is tan, cabinets are birch, and walls are villa grey snow for a modern look that lets in a lot of light (all materials inside and out are high quality and long lasting)
  • custom dividers I made for the under-seat storage area

 

kitchen

  • large low-power 12v/110v compressor fridge (this can be left running off the camper batteries as they charge from the solar panels on the roof — I’ve gone on long trips without plugging in and never ran out of power. If you prefer to run from shore power, the refrigerator will automatically switch over to 110V when plugging the camper into an electrical outlet)
  • two burner stove (one burner is standard size, one is larger)
  • smoke detector
  • carbon monoxide sensor/alarm
  • plenty of drawers + hinged cabinets for food storage
  • fire extinguisher included (plus built in spot to hold it)
  • 3 piece portable table (with a built in spot to hold the pole behind the couch)
  • custom latches on a couple of the cabinet doors to prevent opening (if heavy food shifts when driving)
  • stainless steel sink with hot + cold water (with additional valve on faucet so can keep hot + cold water set if desired)

 

bathroom

  • Nature’s Head Composting Toilet (this is an odorless, marine grade, high capacity, waterless, separating, compost toilet that uses very little power for the fan. With full time use, solids won’t need to be dumped for 3 weeks, though liquids will need to be dumped every few days)
  • Thetford cassette toilet is available (this one is practically new. The cartridge easily dumps into any toilet though I prefer the compost toilet for the higher capacity)
  • shower pan (with built in drain that drains out bottom of camper)
  • shower curtain (with tubing for mounting in place and keeping in place at the edge of the shower pan)
  • piece to mount shower head on ceiling (if you don’t want to hold it)
  • longer shower hose
  • cold + hot water for shower
  • shower head has a built in valve on it so you don’t have to change cold + hot water settings
  • in addition to inside shower, an outside shower is built in to the side of the camper
  • additional longer shower pan I made that fits better in front of the Compost Toilet

 

plumbing

  • hot water heater with automatic electric start
  • water pump
  • plumbing for the sink to drain down low near the back of the camper (rather than out the side up high where it normally did)
  • fresh water tank holds 22 gallons + water heater holds another 6 gallons
  • outside water filler door has a lock plus a pass-thru to keep a hose attached when at a campground (if just filling the water, you can just hold the hose in the filling point rather than hook it up)
  • hot water bypass valve
  • low water tank drain valve (outside, at back of camper)

 

electrical

  • 2 130W Sharp solar panels and charge controller
  • Xantrex Prowatt SW600 600 Watt True Sinewave Inverter (a pure sine wave type inverter gives much cleaner/safer power for electronics, laptops, etc)
  • auxiliary battery system with 2 batteries + separator
  • 2 standard 110/120V electrical outlets (2 plugs each) plus one additional outlet on the power inverter for a total of 5 plugs/outlets (2 of the outlets are used only when the camper is plugged into power, the 3 others run off the inverter when on batteries or plugged in)
  • total of 5 12 volt DC accessory outlets in camper (2 near front window, 2 on kitchen cabinets, and 1 near next to power inverter, near batteries)
  • high quality 30 amp marine shore power electricity plug (plus adapters to use a regular 15 amp extension cord) with 30 amp power converter
  • wiring harness to wire camper into truck’s electrical system (wiring into your truck isn’t necessary but will turn on the running lights on the camper body when the truck lights are on and will charge the camper batteries when the truck is running. you will need to install the matching socket for this harness to plug into on your truck and wire it to the truck’s electrical system if desired)

 

windows, doors, vent + hatch

  • front opening window (additionally, I have a second window that I took the glass out of and put a screen in — this lets in a lot of fresh air and helps with a cross breeze while preventing bugs)
  • small opening driver’s side window (with screen)
  • Heki roof hatch (in front of camper, over bed – very nice to look up at the stars at night. the hatch can be locked into position where its partly open, or opened all the way to lay almost flat on the roof of the camper)
  • roof vent with screen and fan-tastic fan (in the back of the camper, near stove + bathroom area)
  • rear door has a dead bolt (in addition to a regular lock and being able to lock the handle)
  • behind the rear door is a built-in screen door (very nice to be able to leave the door open for a breeze and not get bugs inside)
  • four windows on pop up part of camper
  • large side window on passenger side of camper body (opens + is screened)
  • windows on pop up part of camper can be kept closed for privacy and maximum insulation, pulled opened to a clear plastic to see out, or pulled down completely to a screen to let in a fresh breeze
  • small sliding window near rear corner of camper
  • the door and all windows have slide-able curtains for privacy or light

 

exterior

  • radius rear camper door with rain gutter
  • 8’ side awning (on passenger side, extends out 6.5’, comes with long lever/handle to easily open and optional stakes)
  • 2 10 lb propane tanks (accessible via small door on back. propane is used for hot water, the furnace, and the stove)
  • rear yellow light next to door (very handy for finding things at your campsite)
  • front rubber bumpers (to protect front wall of truck bed)
  • very strong aluminum frame/cage built for off-road use (similar to an airplane frame: provides ability to flex, greater strength and durability)
  • minimal height over cab makes for lower clearance height and lower center of gravity
  • 4 Rieco Titan tripod jacks (for removing the camper from the bed of the truck)
  • camper can be bolted directly to the bed of truck (for greater strength/security), or attached via a turnbuckle system to eyebolts built into camper (for greater ease in removal if taking on and off often)
  • turnbuckle / eyebolt system is hidden under camper body but easily accessible from inside via small access doors
  • bolt down hardware is included. if you want to use the turnbuckle system, the eyebolts are already installed on the camper though you’ll need to install eyebolts (or other mounting points) onto the bed of your truck and purchase the turnbuckles (these are available from Four Wheel Campers or you may be able to find something suitable at a local hardware store)
  • white RV water hose
  • water filter (attaches to the hose)
  • water pressure regulator (attaches to the hose or filter)
  • exterior dustproof + waterproof lockable storage on side of camper near water and electrical hookups
  • custom camera tripod mounts on roof of camper, next to front hatch and above rear door (these give a great perspective view for video or time-lapse photos of your trip. I’ve had small cameras up there when driving and they stayed secure throughout the trip, though it’d be best to test this before driving at high speeds or off road)
  • hitch mount step (makes getting into the camper much easier)

 

optional, also available:

  • custom built camper dolly (needed to roll camper from driveway into garage if the ceiling is not tall enough to lift the camper up off the truck inside the garage. you’ll need to pick this up separately or bring a trailer as it won’t fit inside the camper)
  • custom modified Yakima bike rack — the hitch mount has been extended so it sits far enough behind the door so the door can open with enough room to climb in (or the bike rack drops down and the door can open all the way) — it also has a large step built on to it that makes stepping into the camper very easy (this is located at the camper dealer in North Carolina where it’ll need to be picked up from)

 

[a.k.a. life on the road]

i recall there being three things i shouldn’t have done here (per the instructions for the rieco titan standard tripod camper jacks): the rear of the camper shouldn’t have been raised higher than the front, the mounting brackets should’ve been screwed or bolted into the camper, and i think the camper shouldn’t have been removed on a slope. i didn’t want to drill holes into the camper for the mounting brackets and i didn’t really have a choice about keeping [...]

 

To watch on youtube, click on this link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4oFCYPtEx8

 

This is a detailed tour + demo of the Keystone pop-up truck camper I had custom built by Four Wheel Campers in 2011. I go over all of the built-in features, custom added equipment, and modifications/hacks/tweaks I made to it. It is currently available for sale (in Florida) with a custom built dolly and tripod jacks. If you’d like to purchase it (or know someone who does), you can reach me by sending me a message at the following link:

markmarano.com/contact

 

Here’s a link to a very long, detailed article I wrote about why I chose this camper and truck after doing lots of research on various rv options:

markmarano.com/2012/01/11/why-i-chose-a-four-wheel-campers-keystone-truck-camper-and-a-4x4-ford-f-150-supercab-heavy-duty-truck-with-ecoboost

 

Here’s an interview I did with Truck Camper Magazine about my journeys in this truck camper:

truckcampermagazine.com/camper-lifestyle/mark-marano-roam-free

 

At these links you’ll find videos of my 72 day “life on the road” journey out west, from Chicagoland to California and then to Florida:

markmarano.com/what/truckcamperfilms/

youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYlEKn8xkNmVcJzBPGDznWUqHbu51wGC3

Here’s a faster version of all those videos combined into one:

youtu.be/kUVuTyxuVXU

Here are just the time-lapses (mostly of the stars) from the videos:

youtu.be/w02JSdm4bJw

This is a time-lapse video of the removal of the bolted-down camper from the truck:

youtu.be/zYlaydCjP7Q

 

More I’ve written about my truck camper and photos can be found here:

markmarano.com/what/truck-camper/

Sped-up 1 minute instagram versions of the truck camper life on the road videos can be found at the following link along with some writing about each day:

markmarano.com/what/truckcamper+instagram/

 

To see my photos, videos, writings, perspectives, etc, visit:

www.markmarano.com

 

here are details of the price and components it has:

markmarano.com/2017/03/11/2011-four-wheel-campers-keystone-pop-up-truck-camper-fully-loaded/

 

thanks for watching! please share with anyone who might be interested.

i’ve put together a youtube playlist of all the 2012 life on the road films in chronological order if you want to watch them one after another. here’s the link:

www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYlEKn8xkNmVcJzBPGDznWUqHbu51wGC3
 

to see pictures from my truck camper journeys or read more about the adventure, visit this link:

markmarano.com/what/truck-camper

(you’ll need to scroll past all the videos as they’re also on that same page)
 

see the short one minute videos i’ll be posting on instagram (and read a little bit about each day), look here:

markmarano.com/what/truckcamper+instagram/
 

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

UPDATE: I’ve sold my truck, though my camper is still available for sale. Here are some photos I just shot of the interior:

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

this is everywhere i’ve been when traveling in my truck camper since i got it. a couple of places (mostly around florida) may be missing as i didn’t track it all in the beginning, and some routes might be slightly off as some gps data was missing [the lines on the map that are straight without any curves probably aren’t the exact route i took, but rather the average from one point to another further away when the gps location was saved].

i just made it to all 48 contiguous states in my truck and camper! [and its not even 22 months since i got both the truck and camper!]

 

this is a compilation of all 72 days of the journey i took from chicagoland to california and then to florida, from september 6th to november 16th in 2012. this is running at 5x the normal speed (otherwise it’d be around 19.5 hours long). it includes all of the following parts:

– from chicagoland to california [a five week adventure]
– life in california [three and a half weeks]
– from california to florida [just under two weeks]

[...]

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[from california to florida]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[in california]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

i just sold my truck to put the funds towards a condo i’m buying. i’m also selling my camper as soon as i find someone interested in it. though a part of me will miss the journeys, having my own place feels more like what i need right now. i will still travel in the future though will consider other options, depending on where and for how long. unless going on many long journeys and keeping a truck and camper for a long time, it may be much more cost effective to stay in hotels (or tents, etc). it’d be nice to be able to stay anywhere one can drive to, though perhaps the solution is simply to get a smaller vehicle that’s comfortable enough to sleep in for one or two nights at time. driving around town would certainly be more fuel efficient and fun in a small car that gets twice as many miles per gallon and can be maneuvered much more easily in small spaces. i may also consider a van (like the sprinter or other similar models coming out now) as it’d be far easier to park anywhere without drawing attention that you are camping in it (and would have lots more interior room than my camper and truck did).

i look forward to having my own place, as it’s been over four years since i was settled in my own space. since then, i’ve been between places, travelling, or living with others, and it’s certainly felt different (and at times not very peaceful). seems like this new place will suit what i was looking for all along. it’s within a mile or so of two nice parks i like to go to that are right on the lake, and in a quiet area with nice trails to bike on. the beach, the gulf, and other parks i like are not too far away either. (and it seems i’m discovering more healthy places in the general area too!)

[a.k.a. life on the road]

[a.k.a. life on the road]

this is a map of my journey this summer to chicago and the rest of the 48 contiguous states i hadn’t yet been to in my truck and camper.

the trip from chicago to maine and back to florida wasn’t quite as epic as my journey last fall. this one was 4680.4 miles in just under 3 weeks. getting from florida to chicago was only 1373.6 miles in 5 days, though i stayed in chicagoland much longer than originally intended. the whole round trip including time and driving around chicagoland was 6563.5 miles in 9 weeks. i took my truck and camper across the border to canada for the first time to go to roosevelt campobello international park. i ended up sleeping in a parking lot near the lighthouse at the northern tip of the island as someone i met up there (who was towing a camper) told me the locals said it was fine and there were no signs indicating against it. i had met someone else in the park at the southern tip of the island who told me about that lighthouse location which i didn’t know about before. perhaps i’ll take a trip to all the provinces of canada and alaska in the upcoming years..