2019 September

technically, i purchased my first electric car 5 months + 1 day + some hours ago, though i didn’t drive it for 30 days straight due to a health issue, so have titled this approximately 1/3 year (or 4 months) worth of driving. the large majority of what you see on the map was actually done within the first 3 months worth of driving.. only a few ‘lines’ on the map were added in the most recent month of driving (in just 6 long drives), most noticeably, the northeastern-most route, the southwestern-most route, and some lines in the new tampa / wesley chapel area.

my electrical “fuel” cost has averaged 2.5 cents per mile the whole time i’ve had the car. i’ve been able to go almost everywhere just charging at home (on a standard 120v outlet slow charger). i have used free 240v public chargers a few times, though, other than the couple trips furthest south, i would’ve been able to make it home without charging had i let the charge % go a bit lower (and if i hadn’t combined a couple routes into the same day’s drive or taken the very long out-of-the-way route home).

i’m glad i got a fiat 500e (that had very low miles on it and was practically new). had i gotten a bmw i3 (without the range extender), it wouldn’t have been able to make it as far without stopping to charge (since it doesn’t let you use the full capacity of the battery). had i gotten a nissan leaf, the battery probably would’ve already had some degradation (as it has no thermal management / liquid cooling and this is a common issue), and i wouldn’t have been able to go as far either. also a lot of the used i3 and leaf models that i looked were not in as good condition and had odors of smoke.

i look forward to the upcoming release of electric vans and trucks to be able to easily travel the entire country without a drop of gas or oil. just the other day i learned about someone taking an electric stepvan with a huge solar array on the roof from the arctic circle to the bottom of argentina all on renewable energy.. it’s not an ideal setup (with limited range per charge), but still inspiring to see it being done. i would totally consider converting an electric stepvan into a camper or tiny home and traveling around the country in it. even without solar panels, it could be taken many places with current charging networks.

electrical vehicles have less environmental impact, lower long term costs (from lower maintenance and fuel costs), and better performance than vehicles with gas or diesel engines. some used EV’s can be found at really low prices too (i bought mine for around 1/3 of the new sticker price, and it still had a hint of new car smell to it). if you want to talk to others about their EV experiences, “national drive electric drive week” is about a week away and there are hundreds of local meet-up events throughout the country.

besides the lower environmental impact, the effect on human health will be much lower too. imagine how nice the world will be, especially in dense urban and sub-urban areas, when one can walk or sit outside without breathing in exhaust or pollution from vehicles driving by (especially from vehicles with a dirty diesel engine or vehicles that are old or not in good running condition). it’ll also be really nice not to hear loud internal combustion engines as cars pass by, especially ones that sound like they’re about to fall apart and make so much noise to barely move. hearing engines echoing loudly in the distance will become a thing of the past. some people with ego issues may think louder is better (or feel the urge to annoy others with loud noise), though once one experiences how effortlessly, quietly, smoothly, and quickly electric vehicles can accelerate, there will be no question how much better performance is in electrical vehicles. just imagine being a truck driver and how much nicer (and healthier) the experience will be.. headaches from the noise and vibration all day will no longer be an issue.