Home (trailer)

This visually dramatic special illustrates the planet’s fragile state entirely from a birds-eye view in stunning high definition. With spectacular aerial views from more than 50 countries, viewers will see the extent of human impact on our landscapes. And not a moment too soon: In the past 50 years -a single lifetime – the Earth has been more radically changed than by all previous generations of humanity.

www.homethemovie.org/en

and a couple short films:

Of Forests and People

Yann Arthus-Bertrand was appointed by the United Nations to produce the official film for the International Year of Forests.

Following the success of Home which was seen by 400 million people, the photographer began producing a short 7-minute film on forests made up of aerial images from Home and the Earth from Above television programmes.
This film will be shown during a plenary session of the Ninth Session of United Nations Forum on Forests (24 January – 4 February 2011) in New York. It will be available to all from February 2 – for free – so that it can be shown worldwide. To have all information or to download the movie offorestsandmen.org

 

Forests cover a third of the Earth’s surface. They are home to over half of terrestrial species and hundreds of millions of human beings. Forests provide part of one in four people’s incomes. For 7 billion people, most of the world’s population, forests are resources for the food they eat, the air they breathe and the medicines they consume. And yet, forests remain unknown and and wrongly loved. And most of all, they are in danger.

The United Nations declared the International Year of Forests, 2011. It is an opportunity to discover, rediscover, celebrate, cherish, describe, protect and use these ecosystems more sustainably. These ecosystems were formed hundreds of millions of years ago before the first humanoids. Today, we threaten them.

Forest destruction is not inevitable: throughout the world, men and women fight to save them. Citizens, scientists, politicians and businessmen warn us about the threats forests face and suggest alternatives to protect them. This year is an opportunity to celebrate their initiatives and their efforts.

 

Desertification

Contrary to popular perception, desertification is not the loss of land to desert or through sand-dune movement. It refers to land degradation resulting from climatic variations and human activities.
It is not a natural process; it is the result of mankind’s actions.
Today, a third of land is threatened by desertification.